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Mirrorless Camera

Best Mirrorless Cameras in India - Reviews and Comparison 2021

We picked the 7 best mirrorless cameras in 2021 for your budget and use cases.

As technology is advancing, it is becoming more challenging to answer the question, ‘Which camera I should buy?' In fact, it is hard to choose a camera in a single category, let alone amongst all the types. And here we are talking about a mirrorless camera. There is a wide range available in the market of the same, and it is natural to feel confused when it comes to buying the best mirrorless camera of 2021. Therefore, we have picked and reviewed the seven best mirrorless camera in India under ₹ 1,00,000 for beginners to pro.

Action Cameras

DSLR Camera

UPDATED

11/26/2021

Model

Our Rating

Rating

Resolution (in megapixel)

Viewfinder

Lens (in mm)

Pro's & Con's

Sensor Size

Sensor Type

Weight (in Kg)

Image Stabilization

Autofocus

Self-timer

Display Type

Display Size (in inches)

Video Resolution

ISO Range

Connectivity

Max Shutter Speed (in seconds)

Optical Zoom

Flash Mode Description

Battery Life

EOS M50

Canon

EOS M50

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Our Rating

9.8 / 10

11/2020

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24.1

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2.36M-dot OLED EVF

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15-45

Dual Pixel AF performs well even in low light
New C-Raw format cuts file size with minimal effect on image quality
More AF points and larger phase-detect coverage area with select lenses
First non-pro camera from the brand which supports 4K capture
External microphone input
Dual Pixel AF missing when recording 4K
Eye detection limited to single AF
No USB charging
APS-C
CMOS
0.3884
LCD
3
4K/24p
100-25,600
Wi-Fi, NFC and Bluetooth built-in
30
3x
Compatible with EX-series Speedlites
235 shots per charge when using either the EVF or LCD

Fujifilm

X-T100

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Our Rating

9.6 / 10

11/2020

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24.2

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2.36M-dot OLED electronic

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15-45

JPEG quality is excellent
The sensor has low noise at high ISOs
The third dial allows experimenting with Film Simulation modes
USB charging
Grip is included
The delay between pressing the video record button and the start of capture can be noticed
Face detection performance could have been better
Touchscreen can’t be used for Q Menu
APS-C
CMOS
1.37
LCD
3
4K/15p and 1080/60p
100-51,200
Wi-Fi and Bluetooth
30
3x
Auto, Forced Flash, Suppressed Flash, Slow Synchro, Rear-curtain Synchro, and Commander
430 shots per charge

Panasonic

LUMIX G9

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Our Rating

9.4 / 10

11/2020

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20.3

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3.68M-dot electronic

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15-42.5

Continuous shooting at 20 fps with continuous AF possible
AF joystick
Best in class image stabilisation for stills shooters
High-Resolution mode offers extra detail, useful for static subjects
Highly-customizable
Depth from Defocus flutter is distracting at the time of shooting action
EVF resolution drops after shutter is pressed
The screen can not be flipped out while using ports
20 fps mode using electronic shutter can result in rolling shutter effect
Four-thirds
MOS
0.658
Top plate LCD
3
4K/60p
100-25,600
Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and HDMI
60
1x
Not mentioned
400 shots per charge

Sony

Alpha ILCE-6400L

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Our Rating

9.3 / 10

11/2020

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24.2

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2.36M-dot electronic

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16-50

Real-Time Tracking eye autofocus
High resolution, sensitivity and colour reproduction capability
Excellent JPEG and raw image quality
Compact and lightweight design
Weather-sealing
Due to unnecessary settings, the autofocus system can be confusing initially
Lack of in-body stabilisation may limit video and low-light shooting
4K/30p comes with a crop
Doesn’t remember exposure settings between stills and video
APS-C
CMOS
0.359
LCD
3
4K/30p
100-32,000
Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, USB, HDMI, and NFC
30
Not mentioned
Flash off, Autoflash, and Fill-flash
360 shots when using the viewfinder and 410 shots using the rear screen

Fujifilm

X-T30

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Our Rating

9.2 / 10

11/2020

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26

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2.36M-dot OLED electronic

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15-45

Tilting touchscreen display
Same sensor as X-T3 at a much lower price
Burst shooting capabilities
Superb JPEGs
Compact and light
EVF magnification isn’t great
No weather sealing
APS-C X-Trans BSI
CMOS
0.333
LCD
3
4K/30p
160-12,800
Wi-Fi and Bluetooth
900
0.75x
Not mentioned
380 shots per charge

Nikon Z

Z50

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Our Rating

9.1 / 10

11/2020

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20.9

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2.36M-dot OLED electronic

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16-50

121-Point Contrast-Detect AF System
Dynamic range is excellent
Both image and video quality are great
Plenty of customisation possible
USB charging
No joystick for choosing AF points
Lack of in-body stabilisation proves to be limiting, especially in case of video
Four-thirds
CMOS
0.410
LCD
3
4K
200-25,600
Wi-Fi
30
3x
Not mentioned
330 shot-per-charge

Olympus

OM-D E-M10 Mark III

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Our Rating

9.0 / 10

11/2020

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16.1

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2.36M-dot electronic

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14-42

Superb JPEG engine
Great raw performance
Stylish and compact body
Controls are well-placed
Tilting touchscreen LCD
No USB charging
16MP starting to look a little dated
Default noise reduction
Auto mode limits you to exaggerated colour rendition
APS-C
CMOS
0.45
LCD
3.2
4K/30p
100-51,200
Bluetooth and Wi-Fi
30
Not mentioned
Not mentioned
320 shots per charge

Canon

EOS M50


1

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Our Rating

9.8 / 10

11/2020

Pro's & Con's

Dual Pixel AF performs well even in low light
New C-Raw format cuts file size with minimal effect on image quality
More AF points and larger phase-detect coverage area with select lenses
First non-pro camera from the brand which supports 4K capture
External microphone input
Dual Pixel AF missing when recording 4K
Eye detection limited to single AF
No USB charging

Features

Resolution (in megapixel)

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24.1

Viewfinder

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2.36M-dot OLED EVF

Lens (in mm)

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15-45

Sensor Size

APS-C

Sensor Type

CMOS

Weight (in Kg)

0.3884

Image Stabilization

Autofocus

Self-timer

Display Type

LCD

Display Size (in inches)

3

Video Resolution

4K/24p

ISO Range

100-25,600

Connectivity

Wi-Fi, NFC and Bluetooth built-in

Max Shutter Speed (in seconds)

30

Optical Zoom

3x

Flash Mode Description

Compatible with EX-series Speedlites

Battery Life

235 shots per charge when using either the EVF or LCD

Your guides

Aditi Lohia

Aditi Lohia

Buyer's Guide - Best Mirrorless Cameras in India 2021

Your guide to capture the best moments!

1

Features: Most important purchase criteria for a mirrorless camera

What should you look for when buying a new mirrorless camera?

2

Use Cases: The best mirrorless camera for you

Which type of mirrorless camera is best for your use cases?

3

FAQ: Learn more about the details

Any questions left? Here they are, including answers.

4

How-To: Usage hints and care instructions for a mirrorless camera

Care tips for a long life of your mirrorless camera.

1. Features: Most important purchase criteria for a mirrorless camera

1.1 Lens

Before we throw a light on which type of lens is the best for different kind of shoots, let’s know the ABC of the lens in brief.

Focal length: This is the crucial feature of a lens and is measured in millimetres. Typically, lenses under 24mm are of ultra-wide-angle, 24-35mm are wide-angle, standard ones consist of 35mm to 70mm, and telephoto lenses are above that. Furthermore, macro lenses are considered to capture very close subjects and lie in the 35-100mm range.

Prime vs zoom. It is easy to differentiate between the two. A zoom lens is versatile and makes it easier to capture subjects without moving much. Whereas, the prime lens usually offers better optics and low-light performance for the same price.

Mount. Another, most important thing about the lens is that they are designed for specific brands and sensor sizes (full-frame, APS-C or Micro Four Thirds). Full-frame lenses for brands like Canon, Sony and Nikon can be used for their APS-C models. Similarly, you can use APS-C lenses on a full-frame camera, but the image will be cropped and zoomed in. All-in-all, you should buy lenses made specifically for your camera.

Choice of length mainly depends on what you want to shoot. For instance, a portrait photographer will go for a 50-85mm fixed (prime) lens as that will flatter a human face. Similarly, a product photographer may choose a macro lens, architectural and landscape photographers can get the best shot with wide-angle zoom or fixed lenses, and wildlife and sports shooters will be drawn to fast telephoto fixed or zoom lenses.

Tip: Mirrorless cameras do come with the kit lens, which is not that reliable. Majority of the kit lenses proves to be good for nothing in low light and have a mediocre image and build quality. Therefore, it is advised to keep at least one or two additional lenses.

Before we throw a light on which type of lens is the best for different kind of shoots, let’s know the ABC of the lens in brief.

Focal length: This is the crucial feature of a lens and is measured in millimetres. Typically, lenses under 24mm are of ultra-wide-angle, 24-35mm are wide-angle, standard ones consist of 35mm to 70mm, and telephoto lenses are above that. Furthermore, macro lenses are considered to capture very close subjects and lie in the 35-100mm range.

Prime vs zoom. It is easy to differentiate between the two. A zoom lens is versatile and makes it easier to capture subjects without moving much. Whereas, the prime lens usually offers better optics and low-light performance for the same price.

Mount. Another, most important thing about the lens is that they are designed for specific brands and sensor sizes (full-frame, APS-C or Micro Four Thirds). Full-frame lenses for brands like Canon, Sony and Nikon can be used for their APS-C models. Similarly, you can use APS-C lenses on a full-frame camera, but the image will be cropped and zoomed in. All-in-all, you should buy lenses made specifically for your camera.

Choice of length mainly depends on what you want to shoot. For instance, a portrait photographer will go for a 50-85mm fixed (prime) lens as that will flatter a human face. Similarly, a product photographer may choose a macro lens, architectural and landscape photographers can get the best shot with wide-angle zoom or fixed lenses, and wildlife and sports shooters will be drawn to fast telephoto fixed or zoom lenses.

Tip: Mirrorless cameras do come with the kit lens, which is not that reliable. Majority of the kit lenses proves to be good for nothing in low light and have a mediocre image and build quality. Therefore, it is advised to keep at least one or two additional lenses.

1.2 Resolution

Resolution refers to the amount of detail a camera can capture, and it is measured in megapixel. More pixels means more detail capturing and a larger picture free from any blurriness. Most of the professional cameras support over 16 million pixels or 20 million pixels for large-format.

Resolution refers to the amount of detail a camera can capture, and it is measured in megapixel. More pixels means more detail capturing and a larger picture free from any blurriness. Most of the professional cameras support over 16 million pixels or 20 million pixels for large-format.

1.3 Viewfinder

The high-resolution viewfinder was reserved for DSLR for a long time. It was considered that this feature is essential only for serious photographers. However, as mirrorless camera grew in popularity, manufacturers worked on making the type bigger by incorporating higher-resolution panels and boosting their refresh rate.

Undoubtedly viewfinder of 5.76 million-dot is the best, but 3.69 million-dot units will also do a stellar job. Make sure if you want a quality picture then never settle for anything less than 2.36 million dots. Combination of 3.69 million dots and a magnification of around 0.76x or higher will give you the ideal result.

The high-resolution viewfinder was reserved for DSLR for a long time. It was considered that this feature is essential only for serious photographers. However, as mirrorless camera grew in popularity, manufacturers worked on making the type bigger by incorporating higher-resolution panels and boosting their refresh rate.

Undoubtedly viewfinder of 5.76 million-dot is the best, but 3.69 million-dot units will also do a stellar job. Make sure if you want a quality picture then never settle for anything less than 2.36 million dots. Combination of 3.69 million dots and a magnification of around 0.76x or higher will give you the ideal result.

1.4 Sensor Size

Sensor size plays a crucial role in selecting a mirrorless camera. Sensor size matters as it determines how much light will be used to create an image. A bigger sensor means more information is recorded, and therefore, better photos are produced. Further, a large size sensor helps in isolating a subject in focus while having the rest of the image blurred. However, the big sensor comes with their own demerit. A bigger camera sensor will take up more room in a camera. Also, it will need a bigger lens to cast an image over it.

There are different sensor size used by different brands in their mirrorless camera. Let’s take a look at different sensor size against 36x 24mm full-frame size.

APS-H: 27.9 x 18.6mm

APS-C: 23.6 x 15.6mm

APS-C (Canon): 22.2 x 14.8mm

Micro Four Thirds 4/3”: 17.3 x 13mm

Sensor size plays a crucial role in selecting a mirrorless camera. Sensor size matters as it determines how much light will be used to create an image. A bigger sensor means more information is recorded, and therefore, better photos are produced. Further, a large size sensor helps in isolating a subject in focus while having the rest of the image blurred. However, the big sensor comes with their own demerit. A bigger camera sensor will take up more room in a camera. Also, it will need a bigger lens to cast an image over it.

There are different sensor size used by different brands in their mirrorless camera. Let’s take a look at different sensor size against 36x 24mm full-frame size.

APS-H: 27.9 x 18.6mm

APS-C: 23.6 x 15.6mm

APS-C (Canon): 22.2 x 14.8mm

Micro Four Thirds 4/3”: 17.3 x 13mm

1.5 Sensor Type

Digital cameras have two types of sensor, i.e. CCD (Charge Coupled Device) sensors and

CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) sensors. Amongst these, CMOS is the sensor type which is primarily used in the mirrorless camera since they are cheaper and consume less power. It translates pixel measurements simultaneously and gives faster results.

Digital cameras have two types of sensor, i.e. CCD (Charge Coupled Device) sensors and

CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) sensors. Amongst these, CMOS is the sensor type which is primarily used in the mirrorless camera since they are cheaper and consume less power. It translates pixel measurements simultaneously and gives faster results.

1.6 Weight

One of the reasons behind the extending demand of the mirrorless camera is its lightweight. Carrying DSLR everywhere is not possible. On top of that, expensive telephoto zoom lenses are no less than a hassle. Speaking in numbers, DSLRs are almost twice as heavy as mirrorless cameras and approximately 40% bulkier!

One of the reasons behind the extending demand of the mirrorless camera is its lightweight. Carrying DSLR everywhere is not possible. On top of that, expensive telephoto zoom lenses are no less than a hassle. Speaking in numbers, DSLRs are almost twice as heavy as mirrorless cameras and approximately 40% bulkier!

1.7 Image Stabilisation

Image stabilisation, as the name goes, is a feature that helps in reducing the blurriness associated with the motion of a camera by keeping the image stabilised. The feature is available in both inside the mirrorless camera and compatible lenses. However, sensor-based stabilisation is preferred over stabilisation in lense due to three reasons.

One, you get the benefit of stabilisation irrespective of the fact if the lens has this feature built into it or not. You can buy whichever lens you want.

Two, if you wish to use an older lense which doesn’t have image stabilisation technique, you can use that without second thoughts.

Third, the range of the mirrorless lens is still developing; hence, there are chances that the lenses you want may not have stabilisation built-in. But if your camera comes with the feature, you needn’t worry about having it in the lens.

Image stabilisation, as the name goes, is a feature that helps in reducing the blurriness associated with the motion of a camera by keeping the image stabilised. The feature is available in both inside the mirrorless camera and compatible lenses. However, sensor-based stabilisation is preferred over stabilisation in lense due to three reasons.

One, you get the benefit of stabilisation irrespective of the fact if the lens has this feature built into it or not. You can buy whichever lens you want.

Two, if you wish to use an older lense which doesn’t have image stabilisation technique, you can use that without second thoughts.

Third, the range of the mirrorless lens is still developing; hence, there are chances that the lenses you want may not have stabilisation built-in. But if your camera comes with the feature, you needn’t worry about having it in the lens.

1.8 Autofocus

Autofocus provides peace of mind to the camera users. It is the feature that ensures your chosen subject remains sharp within the photo. Due to this feature, you get a clear, crisp, perfectly sharp, focused image.

Hybrid autofocus is autofocus inspired feature, and it gives you the best of both world, i.e. contrast-detect AF and phase-detect AF. It is best to have this especially if you want to shoot a moving object and therefore if you are into sports and other action-based photography, look for hybrid AF.

Autofocus provides peace of mind to the camera users. It is the feature that ensures your chosen subject remains sharp within the photo. Due to this feature, you get a clear, crisp, perfectly sharp, focused image.

Hybrid autofocus is autofocus inspired feature, and it gives you the best of both world, i.e. contrast-detect AF and phase-detect AF. It is best to have this especially if you want to shoot a moving object and therefore if you are into sports and other action-based photography, look for hybrid AF.

1.9 Top Plate Display

Mirrorless cameras offer an LCD display or top plate LCD display. LCD works in the usual way for reviewing photos, displaying menu options, and serving as a live viewfinder. However, with top plate display, you can take a quick snapshot of the shooting settings with no need to look at the LCD or viewfinder. This feature is usually reserved for mid-range and high-end mirrorless cameras as it is a good-to-have feature and not an essential one.

Mirrorless cameras offer an LCD display or top plate LCD display. LCD works in the usual way for reviewing photos, displaying menu options, and serving as a live viewfinder. However, with top plate display, you can take a quick snapshot of the shooting settings with no need to look at the LCD or viewfinder. This feature is usually reserved for mid-range and high-end mirrorless cameras as it is a good-to-have feature and not an essential one.

1.10 Shutter Speed

Shutter speed plays a vital role due to two reasons, i.e. it is responsible for changing the brightness of an image and creating dramatic effects in it of motion blur and freezing.

The camera shutter is like a curtain in front of the camera sensor that opens up only when the camera fires and this is the reason shutter speed exists. When the camera fires, the shutter opens up and collects the light immediately. The duration for which camera shutter is open is known as shutter speed.

Its first effect is motion blur. A mirrorless camera with long shutter speed would mean blurred moving subjects. If you intend to create a sense of motion while keeping other things completely sharp, then you may choose the long shutter speed. On the contrary, freeze motion comes into picture when you use fast shutter speed because then you can eliminate motion from fast-moving objects, like cars driving past.

In conclusion, quick shutter speed freeze the action, whereas longer speed creates an effect of motion when you take pictures of moving objects.

Shutter speed is measured into fractions of a second. Mirrorless cameras can have shutter speeds of up to 1/4000th of a second, the most extended shutter speed on most such cameras is usually 30 seconds. For longer shutter speed, you can use external remote triggers.

Shutter speed plays a vital role due to two reasons, i.e. it is responsible for changing the brightness of an image and creating dramatic effects in it of motion blur and freezing.

The camera shutter is like a curtain in front of the camera sensor that opens up only when the camera fires and this is the reason shutter speed exists. When the camera fires, the shutter opens up and collects the light immediately. The duration for which camera shutter is open is known as shutter speed.

Its first effect is motion blur. A mirrorless camera with long shutter speed would mean blurred moving subjects. If you intend to create a sense of motion while keeping other things completely sharp, then you may choose the long shutter speed. On the contrary, freeze motion comes into picture when you use fast shutter speed because then you can eliminate motion from fast-moving objects, like cars driving past.

In conclusion, quick shutter speed freeze the action, whereas longer speed creates an effect of motion when you take pictures of moving objects.

Shutter speed is measured into fractions of a second. Mirrorless cameras can have shutter speeds of up to 1/4000th of a second, the most extended shutter speed on most such cameras is usually 30 seconds. For longer shutter speed, you can use external remote triggers.

1.11 Video

Both DSLR and mirrorless camera are neck to neck when it comes to video making as both allow full HD and 4K shooting. However, mirrorless cameras offer video makers more flexibility with lenses as compared to DSLR. If you are a serious videographer and look for professional video capabilities, buy a mirrorless camera with high-quality format video.

Both DSLR and mirrorless camera are neck to neck when it comes to video making as both allow full HD and 4K shooting. However, mirrorless cameras offer video makers more flexibility with lenses as compared to DSLR. If you are a serious videographer and look for professional video capabilities, buy a mirrorless camera with high-quality format video.

1.12 ISO Range

ISO is one of the significant pillars of photography. Simply putting, ISO is camera setting that brightens or darkens a photo. As the ISO number increases, a picture gets brighter. Therefore, ISO helps in capturing images in darker environments or gives more flexibility regarding aperture and shutter speed settings. Mirrorless camera typically has an ISO range between 100 (low sensitivity) and 12,800 or greater (high sensitivity).

ISO is one of the significant pillars of photography. Simply putting, ISO is camera setting that brightens or darkens a photo. As the ISO number increases, a picture gets brighter. Therefore, ISO helps in capturing images in darker environments or gives more flexibility regarding aperture and shutter speed settings. Mirrorless camera typically has an ISO range between 100 (low sensitivity) and 12,800 or greater (high sensitivity).

1.13 Wireless Connectivity

Thanks to the increasing demand for a mirrorless camera, manufacturers have enhanced the wireless connectivity capabilities of the mirrorless cameras, and they are genuinely incredible. Despite having Wi-Fi, many cameras have a partner app for either iOS or Android, which lets you control the camera from a smart device. This is not it; you can even transfer images directly to your smartphone from the camera, or the social media sites. 

With NFC, Near Field Communication, another feather has been added into the cap of the mirrorless camera as you can simply tap-to-connect or share photos. 

Thanks to the increasing demand for a mirrorless camera, manufacturers have enhanced the wireless connectivity capabilities of the mirrorless cameras, and they are genuinely incredible. Despite having Wi-Fi, many cameras have a partner app for either iOS or Android, which lets you control the camera from a smart device. This is not it; you can even transfer images directly to your smartphone from the camera, or the social media sites. 

With NFC, Near Field Communication, another feather has been added into the cap of the mirrorless camera as you can simply tap-to-connect or share photos. 

1.14 Battery Life

DSLR is the king of the camera if we talk about battery life. It can take more than a thousand shots at a single charge. For the same number of pictures, the mirrorless camera needs three batteries. Mirrorless cameras consume so much battery due to the massive power demand from the EVF. And this one area needs significant improvement from manufacturers as per the tech experts.

DSLR is the king of the camera if we talk about battery life. It can take more than a thousand shots at a single charge. For the same number of pictures, the mirrorless camera needs three batteries. Mirrorless cameras consume so much battery due to the massive power demand from the EVF. And this one area needs significant improvement from manufacturers as per the tech experts.

1.15 Ergonomics

Ergonomics is often overlooked while buying a camera. However, it is not an element to be neglected. A mirrorless camera must fit into your hand comfortably and should not be too heavy to carry it around. It should be easy to learn, offer easy accessibility to the commonly used features, and menus should be simply structured.

Ergonomics is often overlooked while buying a camera. However, it is not an element to be neglected. A mirrorless camera must fit into your hand comfortably and should not be too heavy to carry it around. It should be easy to learn, offer easy accessibility to the commonly used features, and menus should be simply structured.

2. Use Cases: The best mirrorless camera for you

2.1 I am a beginner. Should I buy a mirrorless camera or DSLR?

There are mirrorless cameras available in the market which is suitable for both beginner and professionals. What matters is the features of the camera. For example, if you travel a lot and want your camera to be lightweight and compact, buy mirrorless. If you need a more comprehensive selection of lenses than DSLR is a better option.

There are mirrorless cameras available in the market which is suitable for both beginner and professionals. What matters is the features of the camera. For example, if you travel a lot and want your camera to be lightweight and compact, buy mirrorless. If you need a more comprehensive selection of lenses than DSLR is a better option.

2.2 Which type of mirrorless camera is best for shooting in low light?

If you shoot in low light and image size and quality is essential to you, choose a mirrorless camera with either an APS-C or full-frame sensor. 

If you shoot in low light and image size and quality is essential to you, choose a mirrorless camera with either an APS-C or full-frame sensor. 

2.3 My budget for a standalone camera is low. Should I buy a mirrorless camera?

The question here is not about buying a mirrorless camera but buying a camera at all.

If your budget is anywhere between Rs. 20,000 to 25,000, think that you really need a standalone camera. If you do need one, then buy a camera that has features which your smartphone camera doesn’t have such as waterproofing, zoom lens. If you can spend a little more but at the same time want to stick with something simple, get an advanced compact camera with a 1-inch-type sensor.

The question here is not about buying a mirrorless camera but buying a camera at all.

If your budget is anywhere between Rs. 20,000 to 25,000, think that you really need a standalone camera. If you do need one, then buy a camera that has features which your smartphone camera doesn’t have such as waterproofing, zoom lens. If you can spend a little more but at the same time want to stick with something simple, get an advanced compact camera with a 1-inch-type sensor.

2.4 I want to move from point-and-shoot cameras. Should I buy an entry-level mirrorless camera or DSLR?

If you require a little more flexibility or control, an entry-level mirrorless camera is an excellent point of starting. In fact, entry-level consumer mirrorless cameras are also the first choice of those who are using an entry-level DSLR and are looking for interchangeable-lens feature and need something lighter and smaller. 

If you require a little more flexibility or control, an entry-level mirrorless camera is an excellent point of starting. In fact, entry-level consumer mirrorless cameras are also the first choice of those who are using an entry-level DSLR and are looking for interchangeable-lens feature and need something lighter and smaller. 

2.5 I want to switch to mirrorless camera from my entry-level DSLR and lens kit since they are compact and easy to carry. Which is the best mirrorless camera for me?

Assuming that you have reached a crossroads in your photography with DSLR, we would suggest looking for a mirrorless camera that is, of course, compact and lightweight. Also, get a mirrorless camera that helps you further grow as a photographer which is possible if the camera has more features than your current DSLR. Therefore, your camera should include an electronic viewfinder to aid with composition, a hot shoe for extra accessories, and it should offer the image quality which is at least on par with your DSLR, if not better than that.

Assuming that you have reached a crossroads in your photography with DSLR, we would suggest looking for a mirrorless camera that is, of course, compact and lightweight. Also, get a mirrorless camera that helps you further grow as a photographer which is possible if the camera has more features than your current DSLR. Therefore, your camera should include an electronic viewfinder to aid with composition, a hot shoe for extra accessories, and it should offer the image quality which is at least on par with your DSLR, if not better than that.

3. FAQ: Learn more about the details

3.1 What is a mirrorless camera?

Mirrorless camera is a compact camera which has interchangeable lenses due to which it is also known as Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Cameras (MILC). Mirrorless cameras use digital imaging sensor rather than a movable mirror and pentaprism to show the digital preview of what lens is seeing to the electronic viewfinder (EVF).

Mirrorless camera is a compact camera which has interchangeable lenses due to which it is also known as Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Cameras (MILC). Mirrorless cameras use digital imaging sensor rather than a movable mirror and pentaprism to show the digital preview of what lens is seeing to the electronic viewfinder (EVF).

3.2 Why should I buy a mirrorless camera?

Mirrorless cameras are compact, lighter, and helps in better video making. However, they come at the cost of access to fewer lenses and accessories.

Mirrorless cameras are compact, lighter, and helps in better video making. However, they come at the cost of access to fewer lenses and accessories.

3.3 Can mirrorless camera be used for astrophotography?

Yes. The quality of sensors found in mirrorless cameras is good. They can be used for astrophotography and night photography since they have full-frame sensors which capture more light. Also, the sensors have a better ISO range.

Yes. The quality of sensors found in mirrorless cameras is good. They can be used for astrophotography and night photography since they have full-frame sensors which capture more light. Also, the sensors have a better ISO range.

3.4 Do professionals use a mirrorless camera?

Yes. In fact, lately, professionals have been switching from DSLR to the mirrorless camera for the benefits it offers such as lightweight, compact, silent operation, better autofocus and video quality.

Yes. In fact, lately, professionals have been switching from DSLR to the mirrorless camera for the benefits it offers such as lightweight, compact, silent operation, better autofocus and video quality.

3.5 What is the average battery life of a mirrorless camera?

The average battery life of a mirrorless camera is 300 shots.

The average battery life of a mirrorless camera is 300 shots.

3.6 Why mirrorless camera is better for video?

Mirrorless cameras come with such an electronic viewfinder, which are useful when shooting video in bright light. Another feature of mirrorless cameras is that they have live-view-only nature leading to better autofocus systems and eventually better videos. Some of the best video cameras in the market are mirrorless and it has more to do with the brand’s experience in making video cameras as it does with the format itself.

Mirrorless cameras come with such an electronic viewfinder, which are useful when shooting video in bright light. Another feature of mirrorless cameras is that they have live-view-only nature leading to better autofocus systems and eventually better videos. Some of the best video cameras in the market are mirrorless and it has more to do with the brand’s experience in making video cameras as it does with the format itself.

3.7 Can I use a DSLR lens with a mirrorless camera?

That is possible most of the time, but you will need an adapter. For example, you can adapt Canon EF-mount DSLR lenses to Canon RF and EF-M mount mirrorless camera with the help of a first-party adapter. Similarly, Nikon F-mount DSLR lenses can be used for Nikon Z-mount mirrorless bodies via Nikon’s FTZ adapter. You can also use one brand’s DSLR camera lens on another brand’s mirrorless camera. Let’s say. You can attach Canon and Nikon lenses to the likes of Micro Four Thirds mirrorless cameras using a third-party adapter. However, one thing is to be noted that the lenses will not give the same result as they do on their native systems.

That is possible most of the time, but you will need an adapter. For example, you can adapt Canon EF-mount DSLR lenses to Canon RF and EF-M mount mirrorless camera with the help of a first-party adapter. Similarly, Nikon F-mount DSLR lenses can be used for Nikon Z-mount mirrorless bodies via Nikon’s FTZ adapter. You can also use one brand’s DSLR camera lens on another brand’s mirrorless camera. Let’s say. You can attach Canon and Nikon lenses to the likes of Micro Four Thirds mirrorless cameras using a third-party adapter. However, one thing is to be noted that the lenses will not give the same result as they do on their native systems.

4. How-To: Usage hints and care instructions for a mirrorless camera

4.1 What to use and not to use to clean the camera lens?

Don’t use your shirt or top to clear camera lens the way you do for your spectacles. They are already soaked up in dirt and sweat and will only transfer that gunk onto your lens? Also, it can damage the sensitive optical coatings. Moreover, the fabric can even scratch the glass. Likewise, avoid using napkins, paper towels, and any paper product which is not made for optical glass. Use lens tissue, microfibre cloth or brush specially made for lense cleaning purpose.

Don’t use your shirt or top to clear camera lens the way you do for your spectacles. They are already soaked up in dirt and sweat and will only transfer that gunk onto your lens? Also, it can damage the sensitive optical coatings. Moreover, the fabric can even scratch the glass. Likewise, avoid using napkins, paper towels, and any paper product which is not made for optical glass. Use lens tissue, microfibre cloth or brush specially made for lense cleaning purpose.

4.2 What are the general caring tips for camera and lens?

Use camera shoulder strap: You know the amount of damage you will have to bear if your camera falls out of the hand. However firm grip you may have on your mirrorless camera, it is best to use the shoulder strap that comes along with the camera. It will also keep your camera safe in areas prone to theft.

Keep it capped: When not using the camera, keep the front and rear caps on your lenses. Also, use body cap on your camera when no lens is attached. 

The sensor needs protection too: Not just lens but sensors are also sensitive to dust, mud and debris. The sensor will get dirty if you don’t protect it. The best way to keep a sensor secured is to keep a lens mounted to the camera. If the lens is causing hindrance in packing the camera, then use the body cap at the time of storing the camera to keep the sensor protected. Moreover, when you need to change a lens on the fly, ensure that the opening of the camera is facing downwards as that will reduce the chances of dirt, debris, and moisture to settle on the sensor.

Charge the camera before the shoot: Mirrorless cameras are not that famous for battery life anyway, therefore charging them before a shoot more recommended. Even when you don’t use your camera extensively, the batteries will still lose their charge over time. If you run out of battery, it won’t kill your camera, but it can certainly ruin important moments. 

Bag is important: If you want to take care of your mirrorless camera on the wholesome level, keep it in the bag. Your camera bag can’t be any backpack. It has to be appropriately cushioned, separating the camera’s body from the lenses, making sure each piece of gear has its own compartment.

Use camera shoulder strap: You know the amount of damage you will have to bear if your camera falls out of the hand. However firm grip you may have on your mirrorless camera, it is best to use the shoulder strap that comes along with the camera. It will also keep your camera safe in areas prone to theft.

Keep it capped: When not using the camera, keep the front and rear caps on your lenses. Also, use body cap on your camera when no lens is attached. 

The sensor needs protection too: Not just lens but sensors are also sensitive to dust, mud and debris. The sensor will get dirty if you don’t protect it. The best way to keep a sensor secured is to keep a lens mounted to the camera. If the lens is causing hindrance in packing the camera, then use the body cap at the time of storing the camera to keep the sensor protected. Moreover, when you need to change a lens on the fly, ensure that the opening of the camera is facing downwards as that will reduce the chances of dirt, debris, and moisture to settle on the sensor.

Charge the camera before the shoot: Mirrorless cameras are not that famous for battery life anyway, therefore charging them before a shoot more recommended. Even when you don’t use your camera extensively, the batteries will still lose their charge over time. If you run out of battery, it won’t kill your camera, but it can certainly ruin important moments. 

Bag is important: If you want to take care of your mirrorless camera on the wholesome level, keep it in the bag. Your camera bag can’t be any backpack. It has to be appropriately cushioned, separating the camera’s body from the lenses, making sure each piece of gear has its own compartment.

5. Did you know: Interesting facts, figures and things to know about cameras

5.1 Smallest lenses for mirrorless cameras can weigh less than 55 grams!

5.2 Japanese’s brand, Fujifilm, plans to capture about 30% share of the premium mirrorless camera market in the next three years in India.

5.3 Dilish Parekh, a photojournalist from Mumbai, has the most extensive camera collection consisting of 4,425 cameras.

5.4 The first digital camera was brought to the world in 1975 by Kodak’s Steven Sasson. His camera weighed around 3.6kg (around 2.5 kg more than modern DSLR) and shot only 0.01MP. 

5.5 Brands have a meaning attached to their name. For example, Canon means a rule, law or principle. Olympus means home of the Greek Gods. But, Kodak means nothing. Kodak’s founder, George Eastman, said that the letter ‘K’ sounded strong, so he formed a word using it.

5.1 Smallest lenses for mirrorless cameras can weigh less than 55 grams!

5.2 Japanese’s brand, Fujifilm, plans to capture about 30% share of the premium mirrorless camera market in the next three years in India.

5.3 Dilish Parekh, a photojournalist from Mumbai, has the most extensive camera collection consisting of 4,425 cameras.

5.4 The first digital camera was brought to the world in 1975 by Kodak’s Steven Sasson. His camera weighed around 3.6kg (around 2.5 kg more than modern DSLR) and shot only 0.01MP. 

5.5 Brands have a meaning attached to their name. For example, Canon means a rule, law or principle. Olympus means home of the Greek Gods. But, Kodak means nothing. Kodak’s founder, George Eastman, said that the letter ‘K’ sounded strong, so he formed a word using it.

6. Our Picks: How we picked the best mirrorless cameras

In kicking off our guide with the best all-round cameras, we considered top-selling models of the renowned camera brands. Besides, we considered Amazon ratings, reviews and also checked features and functionality of each camera in detail mentioned on the brand’s website.

In kicking off our guide with the best all-round cameras, we considered top-selling models of the renowned camera brands. Besides, we considered Amazon ratings, reviews and also checked features and functionality of each camera in detail mentioned on the brand’s website.

6.1 Canon EOS M50

Canon EOS M50 is the best mirrorless camera overall. It gives excellent performance and has a great design in a compact system. It is a go-to camera for photographers looking for a one-size-fits-all.

It might be an entry-level camera but has most of the features that would help you shoot even pro-level pictures such as electronic viewfinder, fully articulating touchscreen, a 24MP APS-C sensor and single control dial. If you leave the battery life, it has everything to offer-4K/24p video capture (with a 1.7x crop), exceptional wireless connectivity via Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and NFC, and Digic 8 processor.

It comes with quick and decisive autofocus. The fully articulating LCD lets you ‘shoot from the hip’ and silent mode of the electronic shutter let you click pictures without making any annoying beeps.

EOS M50 is first Canon’s M-series camera that has Dual Pixel AF system. You can shoot continuously at up to 10 fps with single AF and 7.4 fps with continuous AF. M50 is not a professional camera; however, the image quality it offers is no less than provided by pro cameras. On a more positive note, Canon EOS M50 is a camera that is suitable for one and all.

Canon EOS M50 is the best mirrorless camera overall. It gives excellent performance and has a great design in a compact system. It is a go-to camera for photographers looking for a one-size-fits-all.

It might be an entry-level camera but has most of the features that would help you shoot even pro-level pictures such as electronic viewfinder, fully articulating touchscreen, a 24MP APS-C sensor and single control dial. If you leave the battery life, it has everything to offer-4K/24p video capture (with a 1.7x crop), exceptional wireless connectivity via Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and NFC, and Digic 8 processor.

It comes with quick and decisive autofocus. The fully articulating LCD lets you ‘shoot from the hip’ and silent mode of the electronic shutter let you click pictures without making any annoying beeps.

EOS M50 is first Canon’s M-series camera that has Dual Pixel AF system. You can shoot continuously at up to 10 fps with single AF and 7.4 fps with continuous AF. M50 is not a professional camera; however, the image quality it offers is no less than provided by pro cameras. On a more positive note, Canon EOS M50 is a camera that is suitable for one and all.

6.2 Fujifilm X-T100

If you want head turner design, then Fujifilm X-T100 has it. Its well-built body consists of faux leather and a screw-on grip. The camera’s touchscreen LCD cannot be rotated, but it can both tilt up and down and flip out to the side 180 degrees. The OLED viewfinder does its job just fine. Besides, it has three customisable control dials, including one defaulting to changing Film Simulation mode. It offers superb image quality with vibrant colour and a lot of details.

The autofocus feature is up to the mark when using single AF; however, the camera just can’t keep a moving subject in focus. The battery life is more than average, considering the price of the camera.

If you want head turner design, then Fujifilm X-T100 has it. Its well-built body consists of faux leather and a screw-on grip. The camera’s touchscreen LCD cannot be rotated, but it can both tilt up and down and flip out to the side 180 degrees. The OLED viewfinder does its job just fine. Besides, it has three customisable control dials, including one defaulting to changing Film Simulation mode. It offers superb image quality with vibrant colour and a lot of details.

The autofocus feature is up to the mark when using single AF; however, the camera just can’t keep a moving subject in focus. The battery life is more than average, considering the price of the camera.

6.3 Panasonic LUMIX G9

Panasonic LUMIX G9 has taken a clear shot at pro still market by being the top tier stills-oriented camera. We love the ergonomics as it is a lightweight camera with a magnesium alloy body. Plus, it is weather-sealed and has got a large & comfortable grip which let you access a ton of control with one hand and without compromising your hold on the body.

LUMIX G9 is much more than its body. Its top plate LCD is something you won’t find on any other Micro Four Thirds mirrorless camera. Also, it comes with AF joystick; however, you can’t move AF points diagonally. Speaking of its 0.83x OLED electronic viewfinder, all we can say is that it is immersive and beautiful. The G9 also offers excellent connectivity via dual high-speed SD card slots and USB 3.1 port.

Coming to autofocus, G9 can maintain focus at its top burst rate of 20 fps smoothly. However, the 20 fps burst mode is limited to 50 shots, then you can go for 100 of frames with the 9 fps burst speed. AF-C performance at 9 fps is quite impressive. Despite being a still oriented camera, it mesmerised us with its video quality.

Panasonic LUMIX G9 has taken a clear shot at pro still market by being the top tier stills-oriented camera. We love the ergonomics as it is a lightweight camera with a magnesium alloy body. Plus, it is weather-sealed and has got a large & comfortable grip which let you access a ton of control with one hand and without compromising your hold on the body.

LUMIX G9 is much more than its body. Its top plate LCD is something you won’t find on any other Micro Four Thirds mirrorless camera. Also, it comes with AF joystick; however, you can’t move AF points diagonally. Speaking of its 0.83x OLED electronic viewfinder, all we can say is that it is immersive and beautiful. The G9 also offers excellent connectivity via dual high-speed SD card slots and USB 3.1 port.

Coming to autofocus, G9 can maintain focus at its top burst rate of 20 fps smoothly. However, the 20 fps burst mode is limited to 50 shots, then you can go for 100 of frames with the 9 fps burst speed. AF-C performance at 9 fps is quite impressive. Despite being a still oriented camera, it mesmerised us with its video quality.

6.4 Sony Alpha ILCE-6400L

APS-C has the lion’s share when it comes to the mirrorless camera as compared to full-frame or medium-format cameras. Sony Alpha ILCE-6400L is proof of it. Sony's A6400 lie between brands A6300 and A6500 model and therefore, many of its features match the two.

A6400 isn’t much different from its elder and younger sibling in appearance. It has a round-off hand grip which is perfect for small hands. The slide-out flap on the left side has a Micro-USB port, Micro-HDMI port, and a 3.5mm microphone input. Its command dial doubles have a four-way navigation pad. It has decent EVF with a resolution of 2.3 million dots, and you can run it at either 60fps or 120fps.

3 inch LCD screen is a new addition, but the touch panel remains the same with 921K dot resolution. However, it can now flip-up 180 degrees, and not just being able to tilt up or down like on the previous models.

Alpha ILCE-6400L comes with a 24.2-megapixel APS-C CMOS sensor, and contrast-detection autofocus points. Eighty-four per cent of the sensor area is covered by focus point due to which you are easily able to track your subject. It has an expandable ISO range from 100-32,000 to 1,02,400.

The AI-based real-time eye AF and subject tracking let you detect and track a subject’s face and eyes, if visible with even half-pressed shutter button. You can shoot 4K video without any pixel binning.

Last but not least, A6400 has Bluetooth and Wi-Fi for easy transfer of images. The NFC feature makes the pairing process with compatible Android phones quicker.

APS-C has the lion’s share when it comes to the mirrorless camera as compared to full-frame or medium-format cameras. Sony Alpha ILCE-6400L is proof of it. Sony's A6400 lie between brands A6300 and A6500 model and therefore, many of its features match the two.

A6400 isn’t much different from its elder and younger sibling in appearance. It has a round-off hand grip which is perfect for small hands. The slide-out flap on the left side has a Micro-USB port, Micro-HDMI port, and a 3.5mm microphone input. Its command dial doubles have a four-way navigation pad. It has decent EVF with a resolution of 2.3 million dots, and you can run it at either 60fps or 120fps.

3 inch LCD screen is a new addition, but the touch panel remains the same with 921K dot resolution. However, it can now flip-up 180 degrees, and not just being able to tilt up or down like on the previous models.

Alpha ILCE-6400L comes with a 24.2-megapixel APS-C CMOS sensor, and contrast-detection autofocus points. Eighty-four per cent of the sensor area is covered by focus point due to which you are easily able to track your subject. It has an expandable ISO range from 100-32,000 to 1,02,400.

The AI-based real-time eye AF and subject tracking let you detect and track a subject’s face and eyes, if visible with even half-pressed shutter button. You can shoot 4K video without any pixel binning.

Last but not least, A6400 has Bluetooth and Wi-Fi for easy transfer of images. The NFC feature makes the pairing process with compatible Android phones quicker.

6.5 Fujifilm X-T30

X-T30 is the little brother of the great X-T3. The compact body offers impressive 26MP sensor, oversampled 4K video and the direct controls. Had there been in-body stabilisation, it would have been a complete package. Both raw and JPEG quality is excellent if we speak of colour. Moreover, the sensor’s low noise levels make it a great option for low light shooting. Just like images, video quality is top-notch, with both DCI and UHD capture. The video deserves attention in terms of controls as well. In terms of resolution APS-C sensor, X-T30 comes second in the market (Canon EOS M6 Mark II is first).

Fujifilm X-T30 is clearly a great combination of travel-friendly size and impressive performance.

X-T30 is the little brother of the great X-T3. The compact body offers impressive 26MP sensor, oversampled 4K video and the direct controls. Had there been in-body stabilisation, it would have been a complete package. Both raw and JPEG quality is excellent if we speak of colour. Moreover, the sensor’s low noise levels make it a great option for low light shooting. Just like images, video quality is top-notch, with both DCI and UHD capture. The video deserves attention in terms of controls as well. In terms of resolution APS-C sensor, X-T30 comes second in the market (Canon EOS M6 Mark II is first).

Fujifilm X-T30 is clearly a great combination of travel-friendly size and impressive performance.

6.6 Nikon Z50

Nikon Z50 is one of the best in the mirrorless camera segment. It has borrowed the excellent design and overall performance from Z6 and features 21-megapixel APS-C back-illuminated CMOS sensor. We have received impressive results from Z50 in terms of JPEG files. With a back-illuminated, 20.9MP APS-C CMOS sensor and Expeed 6 image processor, it gives perfect shots. It might lack in terms of peak output resolution but it certainly makes up in terms of overall performance. The super accurately working hybrid autofocus system features a 209-point module. The AF tracking system also works smoothly, even in minute contrast difference situations. In fact, its autofocus system is far smoother than both Sony a6400, and Fujifilm X-T30’s.

The camera is no less when it comes to shooting videos as it offers 4K and 1080p videos at up to 30fps and 120fps respectively. The LCD size of 3.2-inch provides 100 per cent frame coverage. Furthermore, it provides 320 shots per charge as per CIPA standard, including video shooting of about 30 minutes.

All-in-all, Z50 is a capable and comfortable mirrorless camera to use, for a wide range of photography.

Nikon Z50 is one of the best in the mirrorless camera segment. It has borrowed the excellent design and overall performance from Z6 and features 21-megapixel APS-C back-illuminated CMOS sensor. We have received impressive results from Z50 in terms of JPEG files. With a back-illuminated, 20.9MP APS-C CMOS sensor and Expeed 6 image processor, it gives perfect shots. It might lack in terms of peak output resolution but it certainly makes up in terms of overall performance. The super accurately working hybrid autofocus system features a 209-point module. The AF tracking system also works smoothly, even in minute contrast difference situations. In fact, its autofocus system is far smoother than both Sony a6400, and Fujifilm X-T30’s.

The camera is no less when it comes to shooting videos as it offers 4K and 1080p videos at up to 30fps and 120fps respectively. The LCD size of 3.2-inch provides 100 per cent frame coverage. Furthermore, it provides 320 shots per charge as per CIPA standard, including video shooting of about 30 minutes.

All-in-all, Z50 is a capable and comfortable mirrorless camera to use, for a wide range of photography.

6.7 Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III

Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III is easy to handle mirrorless camera with twin dials, customisable buttons, and comprehensive on-screen control panels. And the sculpted grip makes it all the easier to work with everything. We like the Advanced Photography mode as that brings all the camera’s smarter shooting modes together. The Auto mode might prove to be beginner’s favourite since it is good enough at selecting an appropriate scene mode.

The JPEG image quality is rather good, although the sharpening is a little heavy-handed. We have no second thoughts about the underlying raw performance as well since it is equally good. Unfortunately, the autofocus feature of the camera is less dependable.

OM-D E-M10 Mark III has impressive video quality, especially in 4K mode. And when combined with stabilisation feature, it means it’s a pretty good mirrorless camera to play around with. If you are a developing photographer, you have plenty of room to grow with this Olympus model. Checkout reviews and comparison of best tripods, best webcams, best home security camera, best action camera, best DSLR camera for beginners in India.

Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III is easy to handle mirrorless camera with twin dials, customisable buttons, and comprehensive on-screen control panels. And the sculpted grip makes it all the easier to work with everything. We like the Advanced Photography mode as that brings all the camera’s smarter shooting modes together. The Auto mode might prove to be beginner’s favourite since it is good enough at selecting an appropriate scene mode.

The JPEG image quality is rather good, although the sharpening is a little heavy-handed. We have no second thoughts about the underlying raw performance as well since it is equally good. Unfortunately, the autofocus feature of the camera is less dependable.

OM-D E-M10 Mark III has impressive video quality, especially in 4K mode. And when combined with stabilisation feature, it means it’s a pretty good mirrorless camera to play around with. If you are a developing photographer, you have plenty of room to grow with this Olympus model. Checkout reviews and comparison of best tripods, best webcams, best home security camera, best action camera, best DSLR camera for beginners in India.